This Is Our Story

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Five went in. Four came out.

No one knows what happened that morning at River Point. Five boys went hunting. Four came back. The boys won’t say who fired the shot that killed their friend; the evidence shows it could have been any one of them.

Kate Marino’s senior year internship at the district attorney’s office isn’t exactly glamorous—more like an excuse to leave school early that looks good on college applications. Then the DA hands her boss, Mr. Stone, the biggest case her small town of Belle Terre has ever seen. The River Point Boys are all anyone can talk about. Despite their damning toxicology reports the morning of the accident, the DA wants the boys’ case swept under the rug. He owes his political office to their powerful families.

Kate won’t let that happen. Digging up secrets without revealing her own is a dangerous line to walk; Kate has her own reasons for seeking justice for Grant. As she investigates with Stone, the aging prosecutor relying on Kate to see and hear what he cannot, she realizes that nothing about the case—or the boys—is what it seems. Grant wasn’t who she thought he was, and neither is Stone’s prime suspect. As Kate gets dangerously close to the truth, it becomes clear that the early morning accident might not have been an accident at all—and if Kate doesn’t uncover the true killer, more than one life could be on the line…including her own

Fun story about this – I only showed interest in this book because of the cover and that it was centered on a death caused by a hunting accident. But boy was I hooked!

Here is the intro blurb that got me hooked (It’s a little long):

A ten-point buck and a dead body make the same sound when they hit the forest floor. It’s hard to believe a person could be mistaken for an animal, but it happens more than you know.

We know these woods. We’ve spent as much time here as anywhere else. Every hill and valley, every place the deer forage for food and rest in the heat of the day, is mapped out in our heads. We know exactly where the shot comes from when we hear it. Stealth no longer necessary, we tear in form every direction, each wanting to see the kill first.

But that excitement evaporates at the sight of Grant’s body twisted in odd angles over a downed tree. The impact of the bullet knocked him completely out of his boots, which as still upright several feet away.

We gravitate to one another, standing in a tight pack several yards away from him, momentarily scared to get any closer. One by one, our guns slip through our fingers, thudding softly on the blanket of leaves covering the ground. 

And one by one we move closer to Grant.

Stunned, we stand in a circle around him, our bodies covered in camouflage, each of us blending into the next. 

No one goes near him. No one bends down to check his pulse. There is a small hole in the center of his chest and blood pours out of him and soaks into the ground and there is no question – Grant Perkins is dead.

Two of us drop to our knees, crying; another seems unable to move at all.

But one of us studies the guns piled on the ground.

“That’s not a buckshot wound. He got shot with a rifle.”

All eyes go to the Remington – the only rifle in the group.

Concern for Grant is over quickly; the sorrow turns to panic and every finger quickly points to someone else and shouts of “I didn’t do it!” ring through the air. We all handles that rifle and we know it could point back to any one of us.

The amount of booze and pot and pills still flowing through our systems will guarantee that this is seen as a crime, not just an accident.

We push each other.

We cuss each other.

We threaten each other.

We are imploding.

I watch my friends, who are more like brothers, and know this won’t end well for any of us. 

A buzzing sound on the ground beside Grant quiets everyone. His phone, set on vibrate, rattles in he dead leaves. No one moves to touch it, to answer it, to make it stop. We all just stare at Grant. 

Single file, the ants begin to claim his boy. Birds swoop into the nearby trees, waiting for a clear shot at him. We will look guilty if we wait too long to call for help. We will look guilty no matter what. We need to do something – call someone – but we’re paralyzed.

I study each person in the circle, faces tear-streaked and numb from either the shock or the alcohol or the drugs. Or maybe all three. I weigh strengths and weaknesses. 

Only one us pulled the trigger, but we all played our own part in his death. They will find marks on Grant that don’t fit with an accidental shooting. They will find marks on us that shouldn’t be there either. The last twenty-four hours will have them talking about more than what happened during this  early-morning hunt.

“So no one is is owning up to using the Remington,” one of us says, more a statement than a question.

Do any of us remember which one of us was holding that gun a few minutes ago?

Silence as loud as a freight train fills the space, and we stare at Grant to avoid looking at each other. Or looking guilty. 

“If one of us goes down for this, it’ll be as bad as all of us going down for this,” I say. “We can’t let that happen.”

All eyes are on me. One look is blank, like my words are registering, while others are nodding, ready to agree to anything that will keep them out of trouble.

There is only one way out of this, and it has to be together. We all have to agree. 

“This was just an accident. A horrible accident,” one of us mumbles. “Whoever used the Remington should just admit it. There’s no reason to drag us all through this.”

“Even if it was an accident, whoever did this could still go to prison,” another of us says.

Our actions this morning would be viewed no differently than if Grant had died while we’d been driving under the influence.

Negligent homicide.

“Look, I know we’re all scared shitless right now, but wee’ll be fine. There’s no reason for anyone to ruin his whole life over this,” I say.

There’s one person who hasn’t spoken at all, and I realize just how fragile this plan  it. We all have to agree or the whole thing will fall apart. He looks down at Grant and ten back at the rest of us and finally says, “We’re in this together. We stick together.”

I lean forward and the other three do the same. Hovering over poor, dead Grant, I say, “Okay, this is our story…”

Wow.  Like how could I not be intrigued to find out who did it?!

I really enjoyed the setting – it felt very Duck Dynasty to me because of the back woods and hunting (but I love Duck Dynasty so go figure). I loved the court aspect – I lvoe watching shows like Law & Order: SVU. Finally, I loved the writing style. The book begins from the POV of one of the River Point Boys explaining what “happened” that morning. (See above blurb). As you read on, these POV  blurbs from the same boy were at the end of each chapter. The book also weaved interview transcripts, court documents, and other evidence into the story as well. The characters felt realistic. The friendships are complex and their loyalties run deep. I love the small-town feel – my boyfriend is from a small town that neighbors the one we live it, and even with it being so close, I love that small town feeling – even if there isn’t a Target 😉

While, the story centers on the River Point  boys and the accident, they aren’t really “present”. The story is told from Kate’s point of view. Kate is the assistant to the DA on the case, so we learn all the juicy details. PLUS, the DA she works for has a degenerative eye disease, so Kate gets to do sleuthing on her own -which ultimately leads her to solving the nearly impossible case and keeps an innocent boy out of jail.

From the blurbs from the boy POV, I assumed it was each boy telling their part, but in the end we learn it is the boy who was found guilty, explaining the accident, the events during the investigation (aka threatening “the girl” aka Kate), and the final POV excerpt details the boy’s thoughts that day when he killed Grant.

It isn’t a YA novel without some sort of love interest – hello cliche love interest of Kate and one of the River Point Boys. It was a little bit of an insta-love, but still gives me the warm and fuzzies, which was a great way to get a break from the book’s suspense.

As for the killer, I definitely didn’t guess correctly until the final evidence was given. I was back and forth for most of the story.

If you’re looking for a suspenseful  read, pick this book up! Next up will be The Loose Ends List by Carrie Firestone. Happy reading lovelies!

 

 

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Thirteen Reasons Why

Thirteen Reasons WhyGoodreads Synopsis:

You can’t stop the future.
You can’t rewind the past.
The only way to learn the secret . . . is to press play.

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a strange package with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers several cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker–his classmate and crush–who committed suicide two weeks earlier. Hannah’s voice tells him that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he’ll find out why.

Clay spends the night crisscrossing his town with Hannah as his guide. He becomes a firsthand witness to Hannah’s pain, and as he follows Hannah’s recorded words throughout his town, what he discovers changes his life forever.

Spoiler: Unpopular Opinion Alert.

Lots of rants. Lots of spoilers.

I first read this book in 2007 when it was just released. I was in 7th grade and inexperienced. Now with it’s 10th Anniversary, I decided a re-read was in order (Plus, it fits my 2017 reading challenge for a story within a story). Let me say, experience and maturity changes your view on this book.

Before you ask, no, I have never thought about or tried to commit suicide.

I know people that have.

I know people that have tried to.

I know people that wanted to and got help.

Suicide is a sensitive topic and this novel is whiny and unrealistic.

Let’s talk about Hannah.

Hannah is the center of the story. She decides to take her own life and leave behind cassette tapes for each person explaining how they are a “reason” for her death. Clay is our eyes for the story. He received the tapes, but he’s not sure but he’s not sure why. Honestly, I think it was mean to put Clay through the agony of listening to the tapes, when he never “wronged” Hannah in any way. It’s pretty heartless. He had a completely harmless crush, but Hannah felt the need to include him in the mix, so he knew why she killed herself, but that she also liked him. WHAT? Who does that? No one.

Various Spoilers Ahead & Lots of Ranting

As for her reasons, they were petty. A couple made “sense” (I say this lightly, because having mean things said to you or about you is definitely not a good enough reason to end your life). While most were just placing blame on other people. I was really upset when she said Mr. Porter was a reason. Yeah, she “went” for help, but it’s really hard to get help wen you’re not opening up and being cryptic with your responses. Hannah’s reasons weren’t powerful enough to make this a decent piece of literature on a sensitive topic.

I enjoyed the format of the book, but the plot fell flat. There was no clear line as to what Hannah’s motivation was. People were “mean” to her and instead of finding new friends and distancing herself from the so-called friends that were hurting her, she continued to be around people she hated.

Here are Hannah’s “reasons”:

  1. Justin Foley: Hannah’s first kiss who started rumors that it was more than a kiss.
  2. Alex Standall: Put out a list saying Hannah had the “Best Ass of the Freshman Class”.
  3. Jessica Davis: Was friends with Hannah and was upset she was voted “Worst Ass of the Freshman Class”. She hit Hannah (which left a scar) during an argument over the list.
  4. Tyler Down: Picture-taking, peeping Tom outside Hannah’s window.
  5. Courtney Crimson: fake friend who helped “catch” Tyler and started a rumor that Hannah had sex toys in her room and had put out for Justin Foley.
  6. Marcus Cooley: Hannah’s Valentine’s Day survey date match. “Tried” putting the moves on her while on their date. She pushed him out of the booth.
  7. Zach Dempsey: Hannah ignored him so he stole her Notes of Encouragement from her bag in their Peer Communications Class.
  8. Ryan Shaver: friend from a poetry class, until he stole her very personal poem and published in the school paper (anonymously) where English teachers used it dring poetry lessons for analysis.
  9. Clay: He’s not a reason, she just wanted him to know what happened. He then blames himself because he “had no idea what was going on”.
  10. Justin Foley (again): Allowed Bryce Walker to have sex with Jessica Davis and Hannah was hidden in the closet…
  11. Jenny Kurtz: Drove Hannah home, hit a STOP sign, didn’t report it, and a fatal accident happened later that night because there was no sign.
  12. Bryce Walker:Touched Hannah in the hot tub, and then she let him have sex with her.
  13. Mr. Porter: teacher/guidance counselor who Hannah saw because she was “suicidal” and then instead of talking, she was cryptic and uncooperative.

The whole book focuses on blaming people who were two-faced and said/did mean things. Hannah resented these people, and instead of standing up for herself, putting effort into seeking help – not just leaving anonymous notes for the teacher – she blamed them as a reason to die. Just re-reading the reasons above, I’m like, these aren’t even valid points – but then again, there is never a valid reason to kill yourself.

Justin Foley is an asshole and stereotypical jerk-jock from every movie/TV show/book ever.

Alex Standall is a stupid boy and was an immature Freshman and put out a Best and Worst list. It is not his fault that the boys of their class felt the need to fall to the stereotypical rape-culture and grab Hannah’s ass as she walks by.

Jessica Davis was one of her only friends and one little argument ended their friendship forever. If I ended every friendship I had every time we had a disagreement, I would have zero friends.

Tyler Down is an asshole with no conscious.

Courtney Crimson was a fake friend who never looked out for others – and Hannah knew that. She knew not to trust her, but she did it any way.

Marcus Cooley is a jerk who ran with the other jerks mentioned above. Hello – find new friends if you’re having such an issue with the people in this group.

Zach Dempsey acted like a jerk because Hannah turned him down. As someone who went through the public high school system, I highly doubt a guy would be such a jerk to resort to stealing because 1 girl, in a school with hundreds of people, turned him down.

Ryan Shaver, like Zach, is just a jerk. I understand Hannah was upset about the poetry thing, but no one had found out it was hers until the tapes. Her peers didn’t like the poem and found it whiny and blame-y too, but they never suggested that Hannah wrote it. Sorry, you can’t constructive criticism from peers who don’t even know you wrote it.

Clay has no reason to be on this list. It was a bitchy move to include him. Yeah, he wanted to know what happened given the fact he was working up courage to ask you on a date, but he was never inappropriate, he never did anything mean. He was the boy Hannah worked with and the boy who fell in love with her for who she was as a person and never told her.

Justin Foley allowing Bryce Walker to rape Jessica Davis is in no way a reason to kill yourself. Yes Hannah, you were hidden in the closet and were so stricken with fear that you couldn’t bring yourself to put a stop to it, but it is no way your fault. You did not rape her. You do not need to kill yourself over other people’s horrendous mistakes.

Jenny Kurtz is the reason that fatal accident occurred hours after you left the party. She was the one drunk driving and took out a stop sign. It was her fault. Just because she gave you a ride, doesn’t mean you are responsible. Jenny knew what she did. It is not your fault she was irresponsible.

Bryce Walker was an asshole the entire story. Hannah was so made up with her mind that she just let him  have sex with her. She didn’t say no. She didn’t try to stop him. She just let him. She was SOBER and knew that she was going to let him do it.

Mr. Porter was just a cheap shot for Hannah. Throwing faculty under the bus because they didn’t help you is wrong when they asked you questions when you came in and you were cryptic and uncooperative. They wanted to help, but she didn’t want any real help, so she was uncooperative, because she had already made up her mind. This was Hannah’s very weak attempt at a Hail Mary.

The whiny approach in this book was not powerful enough to evoke the emotion needed to make this an amazing story about a sensitive topic. In all honesty, I preferred the alternate ending where Hannah lived. She needed the second chance and the help, and Tony (minor character who was in charge of ensuring that the tapes were passed along) was able to give her that. Clay was able to tell the girl he loved that he was in love with her.

As those in the book community know, Netflix has created a 1 season TV show based on the book. I watched it and definitely prefer it over the book. Yes, the same people are the same reasons in the TV show, but Hollywood knows how to create a show that will make us feel the powerful emotions. They show the parents side of the story (including a never mentioned law suit) and instead of Clay listening to the tapes all in one night, he listens to them over the course of a week or so – maybe a couple of weeks. His story and those who are reasons all intertwine in a way that’s dramatic and evokes the powerful emotions. Leave it to Hollywood to save the story.

That’s it for today’s rant of over-hyped literature that falls flat. Until next time bookworms.

 

 

Life Update + Insurgent: Book vs. Movie

Hello bookworms! As you can tell I have been on a slight hiatus due to school – it is kicking my butt! On a happy note – my first session of grad school is over and I received a 4.0! So excited! I finally have a break, so I am catching up on all of my blogging from August (sadly only textbooks were read during September and October). Now time to catch up!

11735983Goodreads Synopsis:

One choice can transform you—or it can destroy you. But every choice has consequences, and as unrest surges in the factions all around her, Tris Prior must continue trying to save those she loves—and herself—while grappling with haunting questions of grief and forgiveness, identity and loyalty, politics and love.

Tris’s initiation day should have been marked by celebration and victory with her chosen faction; instead, the day ended with unspeakable horrors. War now looms as conflict between the factions and their ideologies grows. And in times of war, sides must be chosen, secrets will emerge, and choices will become even more irrevocable—and even more powerful. Transformed by her own decisions but also by haunting grief and guilt, radical new discoveries, and shifting relationships, Tris must fully embrace her Divergence, even if she does not know what she may lose by doing so.

When I finished Divergent and started Insurgent I tweeted:

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I got addicted to the first two books fast because Insurgent picks up from the exact spot Divergent ended. I do have to say I enjoyed Divergent just a little bit more than Insurgent. Insurgent was full of twists, turns, and completely action packed. The story focuses on Tris and her search for answers to all questions about divergence. We also see her relationship with Four blossom during this difficult time – and it gives you all the feels! Like this:

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And this:

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However, there was another cliff hanger ending – and we all know how I feel about cliffhangers:

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Movie Insurgent had some changes, but didn’t sway from the book too much. I still choose the book over the movie! I love Miles Teller but I hate him in this series. I just want to punch his smug little face in every time his face was on the screen. Also, Theo James is beautiful with his deep, husky voice –> Theo James Speed Dating Questions

That’s all for now. Look for my next blog post on Allegiant! Keep reading bookworms. Have a great Veterans Day weekend!

 

 

 

Divergent: Book vs. Movie

8306857Goodreads Synopsis:

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue–Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is–she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles to determine who her friends really are–and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes infuriating boy fits into the life she’s chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she’s kept hidden from everyone because she’s been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers a growing conflict that threatens to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her.

I’ve been trying to switch up my reading recently. I felt like I needed something new, but I didn’t know what exactly. I decided it was finally time to read the Divergent Series as it has been sitting on my bookshelf since March of last year. Plus, I felt like it was a very hyped up book, and I didn’t want to be disappointed if it didn’t live up to the hype like others I have read recently.

I was thoroughly surprised when I started reading. This dystopian novel was refreshing. Personally, I didn’t align myself with Tris, but I was extremely attracted to Four, or I prefer to call him, Tobias. He was everything you wanted from a book boyfriend, and the best part was that there was no ever-popular, messy love triangle!

Tobias’s character made me feel very…

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as well as…

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this…

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and finally…

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Even movie Tobias/Four was dreamy – Theo James was an excellent casting. If you don’t know who he is, feel free to observe below.

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I went into this book and series not really knowing what to expect. I hadn’t read any reviews. I hadn’t seen the movies. All I knew was that it was within the dystopian genre and everyone within the bookstagram community was in love with it.

I enjoyed following Tris from her home in Abnegation – a faction that believes selflessness is the way the world should be – to her new home in Dauntless – a faction that believes bravery is the most important thing in the world. She has spent her whole life being conditioned to think selflessly and be selfless. In Dauntless, she can think freely, ask freely, and become her own person. It just goes to show that a change in environment, can drastically change a person and their outlook on the world.

For those who are new to the blog, I am a firm believer in the idea that the book is always better. In the case of Divergent by Veronica Roth, I can say that the book was 10,000x better than the movie. Go figure.

The movie wasn’t bad. There were things added that weren’t in the book while some things in the book weren’t in the movie. I thought the casting was good [see Theo James casting above]. One thing I did not like was Kate Winslet. I am a huge Kate Winslet fan and I absolutely hated seeing her play the worst [as in evil and demented] character in the entire series. It broke my Kate-Winslet-loving heart.

To end my first post on this series, I thought it might be interesting to see which faction I belong in. Here are my results from the Official Divergent Aptitude Test found HERE .

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Next up on the Review To-Do List is Insurgent: Book vs. Movie. Until next time bookworms. Happy reading!

 

The Help

6588662Goodreads Synopsis:

Three ordinary women are about to take one extraordinary step.

Twenty-two-year-old Skeeter has just returned home after graduating from Ole Miss. She may have a degree, but it is 1962, Mississippi, and her mother will not be happy till Skeeter has a ring on her finger. Skeeter would normally find solace with her beloved maid Constantine, the woman who raised her, but Constantine has disappeared and no one will tell Skeeter where she has gone.

Aibileen is a black maid, a wise, regal woman raising her seventeenth white child. Something has shifted inside her after the loss of her own son, who died while his bosses looked the other way. She is devoted to the little girl she looks after, though she knows both their hearts may be broken.

Minny, Aibileen’s best friend, is short, fat, and perhaps the sassiest woman in Mississippi. She can cook like nobody’s business, but she can’t mind her tongue, so she’s lost yet another job. Minny finally finds a position working for someone too new to town to know her reputation. But her new boss has secrets of her own.

Seemingly as different from one another as can be, these women will nonetheless come together for a clandestine project that will put them all at risk. And why? Because they are suffocating within the lines that define their town and their times. And sometimes lines are made to be crossed.

In pitch-perfect voices, Kathryn Stockett creates three extraordinary women whose determination to start a movement of their own forever changes a town, and the way women—mothers, daughters, caregivers, friends—view one another. A deeply moving novel filled with poignancy, humor, and hope, The Help is a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don’t.

Literally the synopsis from Goodreads is all you need to make up your mind about this book! I was hooked from the beginning.

I had seen the movie before reading the book. I loved the movie, but was skeptical to picking up the book because I wasn’t sure if they had made the movie funnier or if the lightheartedness of the movie would be the same in the book. I was so wrong to be skeptical! Despite the book depicting a controversial time in American history, Stockett created the same kind-hearted, realistic story for all to enjoy. It’s no wonder that it is a NYTimes Bestseller!

One thing I liked most about the book was that it didn’t solely focus on Skeeter and her journey to expose how black maids were treated by white families. We were also introduced to two of the maids featured in Skeeter’s book – Aibileen and Minny. The weaving of all three stories and point of views was seamless.  I never felt confused or had to back track and I genuinely cared about the characters.

This is also the first historical fiction I have ever read and I can say that I really enjoyed it. I hope to add it to my genres in the future! If you’re looking for a book to read on a long flight, this is definitely the one for you!

I’m not going to review Stardust by Neil Gaiman or Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin, because I honestly did not like either of them enough to put anything into words for a post. However, or my next post I’m diving into Divergent by Veronica Roth! Happy reading bookworms!

Dream Catcher Trilogy

Hello lovelies! I finally have some extra time to catch up on some blogging! Here is my review of the Dream Catcher Trilogy by Lisa McMann from the month of June!

1661957Wake (#1)

For seventeen-year-old Janie, getting sucked into other people’s dreams is getting old. Especially the falling dreams, the naked-but-nobody-notices dreams, and the sex-crazed dreams. Janie’s seen enough fantasy booty to last her a lifetime.
She can’t tell anybody about what she does they’d never believe her, or worse, they’d think she’s a freak. So Janie lives on the fringe, cursed with an ability she doesn’t want and can’t control.
Then she falls into a gruesome nightmare, one that chills her to the bone. For the first time, Janie is more than a witness to someone else’s twisted psyche. She is a participant.

I was really excited for this book. The plot sounded interesting, but upon reading, I became disappointed. First off, I was excited for a supernatural-romance. However, Janie, the main character, met Cabel and suddenly they were head over heels for one another. In some books, escalated romances work, but this one, not so much.

The narration was irritating. It was a third-person, but present tense, and it didn’t work for the flow of the plot. Not to mention, the plot was very vague, weird, and choppy. I feel like this whole book was a generalized introduction for the other two books. As a reader I was not pulled in and wanting more until the very end, at which it ended in a cliffhanger and still no answers to any of the main questions.

Ultimately, I read rest of the trilogy simply because I wanted to see how they continue the story and connect to the “supernatural power” of falling into people’s dreams.

Fade

Fade (#2)

SOME NIGHTMARES NEVER END.

For Janie and Cabel, real life is getting tougher than the dreams. They’re just trying to carve out a little (secret) time together, but no such luck.

Disturbing things are happening at Fieldridge High, yet nobody’s talking. When Janie taps into a classmate’s violent nightmares, the case finally breaks open — but nothing goes as planned. Not even close. Janie’s in way over her head, and Cabe’s shocking behavior has grave consequences for them both.

Worse yet, Janie learns the truth about herself and her ability — and it’s bleak. Seriously, brutally bleak. Not only is her fate as a dream catcher sealed, but what’s to come is way darker than she’d feared….

After reading all three books, I have to say that the second book is better than the first and third. This book shows a little more mystery in the plot and is more developed than the first, but the writing was still simple. However, the plot was a little far-fetched and not relatable for a high school student. I understand their is a sort of supernatural aspect to the book, but even the every day scenes weren’t entirely realistic.

After their whirl-wind romance in the first book, Cabel and Janie’s relationship was more developed and not so puppy-love-at-first-sight in this book. However, they are definitely that couple that needs to take a chill-pill because their relationship is a constant roller-coaster of emotions and moodiness.

7823635Gone (#3)

Things should be great for Janie—she has graduated from high school and is spending her summer with Cabel, the guy she’s totally in love with. But deep down she’s panicking about how she’s going to survive her future when getting sucked into other people’s dreams is really starting to take its toll.

Things get even more complicated when she meets her father for the very first time—and he’s in a coma. As Janie uncovers his secret past, she begins to realize that the choice thought she had has more dire consequences than she ever imagined.

In all honesty, I should have stopped reading after the second book. I had higher hopes for this book seeing as I had enjoyed the second more than the first, but this book was poorly written in comparison to the first two. The plot had a lot of WTF moments. I felt as though this book was meant to bring the trilogy full circle, but it felt like an extended epilogue that really should not have happened.

There is no real story. Janie mopes around for almost the entire book, and any depth or personality the characters had completely disappeared. The “romance” aspect completely disappeared. Why try to make us love characters – especially a sweet, over-protective guy like Cabel – and then take away the romance plot line? Hello! That is the only reason I picked up the third book, I was hoping for a redemption of love! Sadly that did not happen.

 

As for the series as a whole, it’s a quick, easy read. If you’re looking for a filler series in between heavy reading material like NYTimes Bestsellers, then this is a good choice for a dumbed-down, chillax read. I do wish this was all one book rather than three really short books. I also hated how there was zero consistency. In the first we discover Janie’s abilities; in the second we follow Cabel and Janie in an undercover sex scandal operation; in the third we meet Janie’s “dead-beat”, dying father and see Janie as a mopey brat, who would rather be by herself so she can keep her vision, instead of embracing her powers and being with the boy she loves and who basically worships the ground she walks on. There was no point to this story and I should have stopped at Fade. 

Alright lovelies, my next post will be featuring the incredible Hogwarts Library by J.K. Rowling! Happy reading!

Attachments

Attachments.jpg

“Hi, I’m the guy who reads your e-mail, and also, I love you . . . ” From the award-winning author of Eleanor & Park, Fangirl, andLandline comes a hilarious and heartfelt novel about love in the workplace.

Beth Fremont and Jennifer Scribner-Snyder know that somebody is monitoring their work e-mail. (Everybody in the newsroom knows. It’s company policy.) But they can’t quite bring themselves to take it seriously. They go on sending each other endless and endlessly hilarious e-mails, discussing every aspect of their personal lives.

Meanwhile, Lincoln O’Neill can’t believe this is his job now- reading other people’s e-mail. When he applied to be “internet security officer,” he pictured himself building firewalls and crushing hackers- not writing up a report every time a sports reporter forwards a dirty joke.

When Lincoln comes across Beth’s and Jennifer’s messages, he knows he should turn them in. But he can’t help being entertained-and captivated-by their stories.

By the time Lincoln realizes he’s falling for Beth, it’s way too late to introduce himself.

What would he say . . . ?

I was skeptical to pick up another Rainbow Rowell book after reading the over-hyped Eleanor & Park (See that review here). However, I am glad I picked up Attachments, because it was quite enjoyable and I definitely enjoyed it more than Eleanor & Park. 

The main reason I liked this book is because of Beth and Jennifer’s email exchanges. This was how readers interacted with Beth and Jennifer through the entire book. But their emails weren’t the exact reason. The exact reason is that Beth and Jennifer are the epitome of me and my best friend. Beth is scarily just like my bestie, Kendall, and I am exactly like Jennifer. I think what makes it more relatable is that besides us being like the characters, their exchanges through email sound exactly like Kendall and I in our texts, Facebook messages, and in person conversations. Beth and Jennifer made me feel like I was back in my sorority house, chatting it up with Kendall while stuffing our faces with Baskin Robbins ice cream.

Lincoln, the other main character, took a couple of chapters to warm up to. At first I thought it was weird that someone took a job as an “internet security officer” to check all flagged emails, and then I realized the book was set in 1999 and they didn’t have the security software like they do now. However, I did think it was a teeny creepy that he fell in love with Beth by simply her email exchanges with Jennifer, but at the same time we’re bibliophiles who fall in love with fictional characters, so I give Lincoln a break on that one. I also enjoyed how Lincoln changed from the beginning to end. He went from a living-at-home-with-mom, hermit-like person who just kept going to school out of boredom (and heartbreak from his first love) to a person who moved out on his own and made actual friends at work. He grows up right in front of our eyes, and it is wonderful to see a character make that dynamic change.

I do like how Rowell broke up the chapters – Lincoln’s POV then email exchange between Beth and Jennifer the Lincoln’s POV, etc. It was a nice break from reading “normal” chapters. Although the book started off slow, the pace increased and it was easier to indulge in the book. However, the love story part happens much later in the book as opposed to throughout the entire novel like I had originally thought.

Even with the minor things in the book that I didn’t like, I still LOVED the book altogether. It was well-written and gave me that warm-fuzzy feeling I am always searching for with books. I also really want to read Landline, Carry On, and Fangirl to see how they compare to Attachments and Eleanor & Park.  If you haven’t checked it out already, check it out and let me know what you think in the comments! As for my next post, I will be talking about a book I picked up on a whim – Alice in Tumblr-land by Tim Manley. Happy reading lovelies!