The Help

6588662Goodreads Synopsis:

Three ordinary women are about to take one extraordinary step.

Twenty-two-year-old Skeeter has just returned home after graduating from Ole Miss. She may have a degree, but it is 1962, Mississippi, and her mother will not be happy till Skeeter has a ring on her finger. Skeeter would normally find solace with her beloved maid Constantine, the woman who raised her, but Constantine has disappeared and no one will tell Skeeter where she has gone.

Aibileen is a black maid, a wise, regal woman raising her seventeenth white child. Something has shifted inside her after the loss of her own son, who died while his bosses looked the other way. She is devoted to the little girl she looks after, though she knows both their hearts may be broken.

Minny, Aibileen’s best friend, is short, fat, and perhaps the sassiest woman in Mississippi. She can cook like nobody’s business, but she can’t mind her tongue, so she’s lost yet another job. Minny finally finds a position working for someone too new to town to know her reputation. But her new boss has secrets of her own.

Seemingly as different from one another as can be, these women will nonetheless come together for a clandestine project that will put them all at risk. And why? Because they are suffocating within the lines that define their town and their times. And sometimes lines are made to be crossed.

In pitch-perfect voices, Kathryn Stockett creates three extraordinary women whose determination to start a movement of their own forever changes a town, and the way women—mothers, daughters, caregivers, friends—view one another. A deeply moving novel filled with poignancy, humor, and hope, The Help is a timeless and universal story about the lines we abide by, and the ones we don’t.

Literally the synopsis from Goodreads is all you need to make up your mind about this book! I was hooked from the beginning.

I had seen the movie before reading the book. I loved the movie, but was skeptical to picking up the book because I wasn’t sure if they had made the movie funnier or if the lightheartedness of the movie would be the same in the book. I was so wrong to be skeptical! Despite the book depicting a controversial time in American history, Stockett created the same kind-hearted, realistic story for all to enjoy. It’s no wonder that it is a NYTimes Bestseller!

One thing I liked most about the book was that it didn’t solely focus on Skeeter and her journey to expose how black maids were treated by white families. We were also introduced to two of the maids featured in Skeeter’s book – Aibileen and Minny. The weaving of all three stories and point of views was seamless.  I never felt confused or had to back track and I genuinely cared about the characters.

This is also the first historical fiction I have ever read and I can say that I really enjoyed it. I hope to add it to my genres in the future! If you’re looking for a book to read on a long flight, this is definitely the one for you!

I’m not going to review Stardust by Neil Gaiman or Memoirs of a Teenage Amnesiac by Gabrielle Zevin, because I honestly did not like either of them enough to put anything into words for a post. However, or my next post I’m diving into Divergent by Veronica Roth! Happy reading bookworms!

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